Become A FRIEND OF THE BIENNIAL

A FRIEND OF THE BIENNIAL receives the following benefits in 2019:

• Free admission to all exhibitions.
• Free of charge art excursion.
This time we will be heading to the Gorenjska region, more precisely to Škofja Loka and its surroundings. We will be taking a look at the Loka Castle collections, the Škopar House, the Grohar Gallery and the granary with the works of Mihelič.
At the end, we will also visit Visoko, Tavčar’s source of inspiration for writing the historical novel The Visoko Chronicle. The 17th-century rustic mansion lies in the embrace of the surrounding hills and forests, not far from the Poljanska Sora river. With the beginning of the 20th century, the former Kalan Estate became known as the Tavčar Manor after the Slovenian writer and politician Ivan Tavčar. Besides the former residential building, which houses permanent exhibitions and a beautiful wedding hall, there is an extensive outbuilding with a typical double hayrack. The writer had a chapel with a family tomb placed at the edge of the forest, where he was buried himself. There is also a striking bronze statue of the writer close by, with gaze directed towards Poljane, his place of birth.
• Viewing of a selected artist's printmaking studio.
Tanja Pak, artist and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts and Design, who completed her master’s degree at the Royal College of Art in London, is inviting us to join her in her studio at Švicarija. She dedicates her attention to sculpture, spatial art installations and design of useful objects. Her favourite medium is glass, through which she passes on her stories and feelings since it remains a persistent challenge to her precisely because of its variable and elusive nature. She says that they are constantly searching and trying each other out. She exhibits all over the world and her works are included in international collections and publications.
• Pre-festive workshop making original New Year's greeting cards. The workshop is conducted by Admir Ganić, printing master.
• New Year's greeting card – a small fine art graphic print by an invited artist.
• 30% discount on all MGLC publications
• 15% discount on all workshops and courses
• 15% discount on purchases of fine art graphic prints.
• A fine art graphic print from the MGLC Print Studios upon the recommendation and signing up of a new member.
• 10% discount on the renewal of membership.
• A welcome gift when signing up.
•  12-month membership fee: 25 €
• 12-month membership fee for those aged 60 years and over, 14 years and under, pupils and students: 15 €

You can join the Club of the Friends of the Biennial of the International Centre of Graphic Arts by filling in the Membership Form and presenting your identity card and pupil/student ID card at the MGLC Ticket Office and paying the appropriate membership fee. Your Membership Card will be sent to you within 14 days of joining, or can alternatively be picked up at the MGLC Ticket Office. The membership card is valid for one year from the date of joining.

Membership form

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ARCHIVE

From the Biennial Prize Winners Collection: Shifts in the Canon

Robert Jančovič, Rez I Nazenie-Pasca/, 1996, colour woodcut

 

Exhibition:

From the Biennial Prize Winners Collection: Shifts in the Canon

7 November 2019–23 February 2020

Every review of the history of the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts is also informed by the stories inscribed by the prize winners of this exhibition. The selection made by the jury members – esteemed and influential art critics, curators, art dealers and other experts from all over the world – was, for many years, the only intervention into the seemingly multitudinous mass of exhibited artworks. The eagerly awaited and often critically-acclaimed decisions imparted the event with a touch of creative competition and were the driving force of the discourse that was generated by the exhibition in the professional and general public as well as the media. After every Biennial, when the hundreds of exhibited prints disappeared from the halls and what remained was only their trace in the form of an exhibition catalogue, a handful of selected works and artists – the winners chosen by the most prominent international jury – were inscribed into the history of the biennial in capital letters, and hence into the annals of worldwide printmaking.

In a sense, the exhibition of works by the prize winners from the collection of the MGLC – International Centre of Graphic Arts aims to get us thinking about the message of the awards of the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts in the context of the canon of post-war art. Most often, the jury did not validate the Biennial’s basic guidelines regarding the quality of the artworks, nevertheless, their decisions spoke volumes in various other ways. The wavering between the need to consolidate already established directions and discover new, unknown ones can be noticed throughout.

On the other hand, the exhibition offers an insight into the collecting policy of MGLC, an institution based precisely on the heritage of the Biennial. Particularly those works that have been acquired by the museum through purchase and donation in the recent period and works that have not been especially exposed will be on display. They have been arranged chronologically into three main sections from the first exhibition of prints in 1955 to the present.

The shifts in the exhibited works from the first two periods, from 1955 to 1977, and from 1979 to 2001, can primarily be seen in the form and content of the graphic print. The prints demonstrate the emergence and consolidation of new artistic directions in the 1960s and 1970s, especially the distinct aesthetics of art informel, geometric abstraction and pop art. From the pool, not lacking in art celebrities of the older generation, the juries often awarded the most coveted prizes to young artists, the rising stars with highly innovative artistic insights.

The shifts in the printmaking of the late 1970s can also be seen in the award-winning works. With the era of popularity of the more contemporary printmaking techniques having subsided, classical ones, especially intaglio printing, came to the fore again, along with the greater popularity of smaller formats and more intimate subject matter. The award-winning works from the 1980s and 1990s do not bring about any essential artistic innovation, but rather exhibit an interlacement and diversification of established aesthetics and approaches.

With the new millennium, the Biennial experienced some radical shifts and breaks. The display of works in national pavilions was replaced by an original, curatorial approach, which has recently undergone attempts at inquiry and experimentation. At the same time, the range of artwork formats has gradually expanded. A leap from classical printmaking to the art of printing in a diversity of techniques occurred, whereas later the Biennial has also adopted performative as well as other contemporary practices. The two processes have, of course, also impacted the meaning of the prizes and the physical dimensions of the awarded works.

Authors of the exhibition: Nevenka Šivavec, Breda Škrjanec and Gregor Dražil