Tivoli mansion

Tivoli Mansion is the oldest building in the area of today’s Tivoli Park. It connects to the city through the Jakopič Promenade, which was widened in the 1930s by architect Jože Plečnik, who planted a new border of trees on each side. The history of the mansion itself dates back to the 13th century, when a tower stood over the current location, which was demolished in 1442 by the Counts of Celje in the battles with the Austrian Emperor Frederick III to gain power over Ljubljana. Baron George Apfaltrern had a new court built on the present location, which was purchased in 1601 by the Ljubljana Jesuits and replaced with a new mansion building. The Jesuits purchased the neighbouring plots of land and the surroundings of the mansion became a pleasant promenade, whereas the natural amphitheatre behind the building was used to stage plays by the Jesuit students. When the Jesuit Order was dissolved in 1775, the mansion became the summer residence of the Ljubljana Bishop. Later it was passed on into the hands of the Provincial Estates and served as a hospital, warehouse and army barracks, which severely damaged the building. Emperor Franz Joseph had the mansion restored in May 1853 and gave it to Marshal Radetzky and his wife for lifelong use. Radetzky renovated the surroundings and opened the park to the public, for which the grateful people granted him honorary citizenship in 1882 and erected a statue in front of the mansion. The fountain with the statue of a boy that is so famous in Slovenia today was erected in the park in April 1870, and this was probably also the time when the striking four large bronze dogs without tongues by Anton Dominik Fernkorn were also installed on the steps in front of the mansion. At this point investments into the mansion ceased. Initially, city officials were housed in the mansion, and then tenants after the Second World War, who lived there until 1986, when renovation work began on the building for the opening of the International Centre of Graphic Arts. The Tivoli Mansion building is listed as a protected monument.

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The Švicarija: Community, Art and Nature Project

Tivoli – Art with Nature, lecture
Olga Paulič: Tivoli Architecture

TIVOLI ARCHITECTURE
Thursday, 18 October, at 6 pm
admission: 2 eur

The beginning of the architectural design of Tivoli Park is represented by the stately architecture of Tivoli Mansion and Leopoldsruhe Mansion (the Cekin Mansion of today). Later, buildings intended for leisure activities started to appear, especially sports and recreational facilities, as well as entertainment facilities. We must also not forget the important cultural buildings on the edge of Tivoli, which are, unfortunately, cut off from the rest of the park because of the railway line.


Tivoli Mansion.
Photo: Matevža Paternoster. MGLC Archive.

The Secret Life of Books,
literary panel discussions
Nature, Society, People

Wednesday, 24 October, at 6 pm
free of charge

Book: James Lovelock, A Rough Ride to the Future

How are nature and society connected? Do people also create and build nature? What are the links between the environment and social change? How does nature affect an individual? The starting point for the discussion is drawn from the ideas of the Švicarija: Community, Art and Nature project.

Guests: Janez MarkešMitja Pucer and Ajda Pistotnik, led by Nika Kovač.

YOU ARE INVITED TO JOIN US IN THE CHILDREN'S STUDIO IN THE ŠVICARIJA CREATIVE CENTRE!

Creative workshops, animations and guided tours of the building are held for children every Friday. The studio operates free of charge every Friday from May to November, from 10 am to 1 pm. The activities are led by the gallery mentors Petra Derganc, Tina Boc, Petja Kolenko and Katja Kovše.

You may like to book your visit by writing to the following e-mail: petra.derganc@mglc-lj.si.

Opening of exhibition: Matjaž Geder, Preparations for improvisations

TODAY

Matjaž Geder
Preparations for Improvisation

17. 10.–11. 11. 2018
opening: Wednesday, October 17,
at 6 pm

Matjaž Geder is an art teacher at the Murska Sobota  II  Elementary School. It is precisely the pedagogical profession that has a profound influence on his creative world, which is constantly in passing from a direct and illustrative visual language to more complex conceptual and symbolically conceived images. He puts the rigid school system, which is based on a way of thinking that is both clichéd and indiscriminate, under critical comparison with the attitude towards the destigmatisation of mental illness, which come surprisingly close in his works.  A selection of works created in the recent years is on view, as well as a series of new prints, produced specifically for the exhibition.



Matjaž Geder: Step-ping, 2018, monoprint, 66 x 100 cm.

Theme-based guided tour of the retrospective exhibition by Riko Debenjak

23 October, at 6 pm, admission for exhibition

Traces on Paper, Canvas, Wall ...
Tatjana Pregl Kobe, art historian: 

Riko Debenjak, illustration for the book Nikolaj V. Gogolj: Taras Bulba, 1948.