Tivoli mansion

Tivoli Mansion is the oldest building in the area of today’s Tivoli Park. It connects to the city through the Jakopič Promenade, which was widened in the 1930s by architect Jože Plečnik, who planted a new border of trees on each side. The history of the mansion itself dates back to the 13th century, when a tower stood over the current location, which was demolished in 1442 by the Counts of Celje in the battles with the Austrian Emperor Frederick III to gain power over Ljubljana. Baron George Apfaltrern had a new court built on the present location, which was purchased in 1601 by the Ljubljana Jesuits and replaced with a new mansion building. The Jesuits purchased the neighbouring plots of land and the surroundings of the mansion became a pleasant promenade, whereas the natural amphitheatre behind the building was used to stage plays by the Jesuit students. When the Jesuit Order was dissolved in 1775, the mansion became the summer residence of the Ljubljana Bishop. Later it was passed on into the hands of the Provincial Estates and served as a hospital, warehouse and army barracks, which severely damaged the building. Emperor Franz Joseph had the mansion restored in May 1853 and gave it to Marshal Radetzky and his wife for lifelong use. Radetzky renovated the surroundings and opened the park to the public, for which the grateful people granted him honorary citizenship in 1882 and erected a statue in front of the mansion. The fountain with the statue of a boy that is so famous in Slovenia today was erected in the park in April 1870, and this was probably also the time when the striking four large bronze dogs without tongues by Anton Dominik Fernkorn were also installed on the steps in front of the mansion. At this point investments into the mansion ceased. Initially, city officials were housed in the mansion, and then tenants after the Second World War, who lived there until 1986, when renovation work began on the building for the opening of the International Centre of Graphic Arts. The Tivoli Mansion building is listed as a protected monument.


Photo: Urška Boljkovac. MGLC Archive.

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MGLC ŠVICARIJA: OPEN CALL FOR CRITIC-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAMME 2022

MGLC Švicarija, a creative and residential centre, in collaboration with the Igor Zabel Association for Culture and Theory invites art critics and cultural journalists from international milieu to apply for a fully funded, one-month residency in Ljubljana during October 2022.

Our aim is to host an art critic or cultural journalist active in writing and publishing reviews and/or other forms of art writing in the international context, and who is interested in Ljubljana’s vibrant art scene and will produce at least 1 piece of writing (review, interview, column or essay) on selected artist(s), art exhibition(s) or art event(s) in Ljubljana over the course of the residency. The text should be published in the English language in a relevant periodical (printed or online), radio, television or personal blog. The selection will also take into account whether the applicant already has an agreement or confirmation for the publication in relevant media of the text to be produced during the one-month residency.

We invite to apply art critics and cultural journalist from international milieu (applicants from Slovenia are not eligible).

Deadline for applications: 10 January 2022.

The period of the residency: 1–31 October 2022.

More information


Photo: Urška Boljkovac. MGLC Archive.

The award recipients of the 34th Ljubljana Biennale of Graphic Arts

The International Jury consisting of Lovro Japundžić, Jen Kratochvil, Sam Lackey and Poka-Yio decided that the Grand Prix of the 34th Ljubljana Biennale of Graphic Arts goes to Johannes Paul Raether.
The Jury presented the Research Residency Award to Mario Mu, who also received the Audience Award, and a Special Mention from the Jury went to the BCAA System collective.

Congratulations to all the prize winners of the 34th Ljubljana Biennale of Graphic Arts!

This Happy Day of Culture at Švicarija

Anja Jerčič Jakob: Fragile Balance

3. 12. 2021–13. 2. 2022

The exhibition will be opened on This Happy Day of Culture, 3 December, at 6 pm.

Painter and pedagogue Anja Jerčič Jakob has been working at the MGLC Švicarija residential and creative centre since 2017. In the exhibition Fragile Balance, she presents herself with two painting cycles, Field Residues (2020–2021) and Weeds (2021).

All visitors to events that will be open to the public at Tivoli Mansion and MGLC Švicarija are asked to comply with the PCT (recovered-vaccinated-tested) requirements.