The collection

The largest Slovene collection of fine art prints and original publications produced after the Second World War, and the only public collection of modernist prints, contains more than 10,000 pieces. 

The majority of the collection is represented by the works of artists that have exhibited at the International Biennials of Graphic Arts. Among these are the members of the École de Paris, (Jean Arp, Osip Zadkin, Pierre Soulages, Hans Hartung, Serge Poliakoff, Zao Wou-Ki, Victor Vasarely), representatives of the COBRA avant-garde movement (Corneille, Karel Appel, Asger Jorn), artists of Eastern Europe, as well as other internationally acclaimed artists: Nancy Spero, Damien Hirst, Bill Morris, Max Bill, Emilio Vedova, Günther Uecker, Robert Rauschenberg, Pablo Picasso, Dóra Maurer, Görgy Galántai, Mangelos, Ivan Kožarić and Ivan Picelj. The collection also contains the complete or partial oeuvres of some of the most prominent Slovene artists working in printmaking like Vladimir Makuc, Janez Bernik, Danilo Jejčič, Bogdan Borčić, Jože Ciuha, Lojze Spacal, Andrej Jemec, Tinca Stegovec, as well as others.

An important part of the collection is composed of art publications, which accounts for about 4,000 pieces – artists’ books, book works, art journals and magazines, newspaper projects, posters and invites, photographic publications, postcards, stamps, stickers, prints, photocopies, sound art CDs, as well as accompanying literature in the form of theoretical pieces and catalogues. The collection began to form in 2001. This is when the Institut Français loaned MGLC 378 works by the avant-garde artists of the 1960s and 1970s, which included works by Daniel Buren, Christian Boltanski, Marcel Broodthaers, Sophie Calle, Henri Chopin, Hanne Darboven, Robert Filliou, Jochen Gerz, Anette Messager, Roman Opalka, Roland Topor and Ben Vautier, as well as issues of the prominent art journals Agentzia, Chorus, Humidité, Opus International, VH 101. The donation set off a systematic collecting of all genres, and with the revitalization of the Biennial, MGLC became more excited by all types of art printing as well as purchases and donations, which grew significantly after the success of the 25th Graphic Arts Biennial, acquiring to date an impressive number of works by authors such as Vito Acconci, George Brecht, Daniel Buren, Christian Boltanski, Marcel Broodthaers, James Lee Byars, Sophie Calle, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Robert Filliou, the Fischli-Weiss duo, Jochen Gerz, Roni Horn, Sanja Iveković, Alfredo Jaar, Ilja Kabakov, Thomas Kapielski, Allan Kaprow, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Mangelos, Miha Maleš, Anette Messager, OHO, Roman Opalka, Iztok Osojnik, Raymond Pettibon, Dušan Pirih Hup, Sigmar Polke, Dieter Roth, Edward Ruscha, Jean Tinguely, Roland Topor, Ben Vautier, Petra Varl, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Franz West, Emmett Williams and Franci Zagoričnik, as well as the collection of original newspaper projects which also included museum in progress from Vienna, published in Der Standard newspaper between 1990 and 2002.

Important museum and study materials are also represented by the FV archive donated to MGLC in 2006 by Neven Korda, the archive of The Scarecrow Statelet, a donation by Milena Kosec, the extensive archive of the events of the Zagreb art scene between 1970–1990 collected over the years by Darko Šimičić, the extensive archive of Bernard Villers’ self-published Éditions du Remorquer (1978–2008), and most of the issues of the Point d'Ironie hybrid periodical (1997–2010).

Presentation of the collection

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Boris Jesih: Connections

30. 11. 2017–11. 3. 2018

Public guided tour of the exhibition
Thursday, 18 January at 5 pm.: conducted by Nevenka Šivavec, Director of MGLC

Boris Jesih (1943) established himself as an artist at the end of the 1960s as part of the expressive figuration circle of painters. Under the influence of pop art, he responded to the characteristics of the spirit of the time with his geometric transformation of everyday objects, later also turning predominantly to landscape. As a printmaker, he excels in the techniques of relief printing and flat printing, with superior results in colour lithography. As a prize winner of the 13th International Biennial of Graphic Arts in 1979 (special prize for a young artist), he attracted attention with his series of lithographs, a set of which is part of the MGLC collection. Beside the lithographs, the retrospective exhibition also presents drawings, paintings and photographs, which highlight the connections between his creative process and his works. 

Boris Jesih: A Doors (1983, color lithography).

BOBRI – 10th Ljubljana Festival of Culture and Art Education

20. 1.–8. 2. 2018

LANDSCAPE – MISTSCAPE
How do we see the landscape?

Viewing of the exhibition and workshop at the Connections exhibition by Boris Jesih for organized groups of children from kindergarten and the first three-year age range of primary school. Conducted by Nika Rupnik. Organised by prior arrangement during the course of the festival. (some places are still available).

Connections / Animation workshop at the exhibition of Boris Jesih
Sunday, 28 January, 11.00–15.00

The workshop is intended for children over the age of 9; parents can also join in getting creative. In collaboration with the SLON Society.
(the workshop is already full)

Guided tour of the exhibition Connections by Boris Jesih

TODAY

Thursday, 18 January, at 5 pm.
conducted by Nevenka Šivavec, Director of the International Centre of Graphic Arts

The tour will be an attempt to gain an insight into the understanding of the connection of the artist's work with the concurrent state of society, which is latently (rather than directly) present in Jesih's creative process.

In his vision, contemporary man is losing his original connection to nature, since the development of civilization has alienated his understanding of its secret powers, their connection as well as possession. This experience has been replaced by the artificial, culturally conditioned perception of the natural environment. Jesih visually separates nature from the viewer, doing so by placing signs – obstacles in front of the illusion of the landscape and in front of the viewer. These are the artist's internal reactions to social events, to everything that disturbs him when he gazes through the window of his studio, where nature awakens into quiet mornings, whereas the reality of people in other places on Earth is completely different. His works are witnesses and a document of today's understanding of the world and man's role in it.


Boris Jesih: Waves (1995, acrylic, egg tempera)