The collection

The largest Slovene collection of fine art prints and original publications produced after the Second World War, and the only public collection of modernist prints, contains more than 10,000 pieces. 

The majority of the collection is represented by the works of artists that have exhibited at the International Biennials of Graphic Arts. Among these are the members of the École de Paris, (Jean Arp, Osip Zadkin, Pierre Soulages, Hans Hartung, Serge Poliakoff, Zao Wou-Ki, Victor Vasarely), representatives of the COBRA avant-garde movement (Corneille, Karel Appel, Asger Jorn), artists of Eastern Europe, as well as other internationally acclaimed artists: Nancy Spero, Damien Hirst, Bill Morris, Max Bill, Emilio Vedova, Günther Uecker, Robert Rauschenberg, Pablo Picasso, Dóra Maurer, Görgy Galántai, Mangelos, Ivan Kožarić and Ivan Picelj. The collection also contains the complete or partial oeuvres of some of the most prominent Slovene artists working in printmaking like Vladimir Makuc, Janez Bernik, Danilo Jejčič, Bogdan Borčić, Jože Ciuha, Lojze Spacal, Andrej Jemec, Tinca Stegovec, as well as others.

An important part of the collection is composed of art publications, which accounts for about 4,000 pieces – artists’ books, book works, art journals and magazines, newspaper projects, posters and invites, photographic publications, postcards, stamps, stickers, prints, photocopies, sound art CDs, as well as accompanying literature in the form of theoretical pieces and catalogues. The collection began to form in 2001. This is when the Institut Français loaned MGLC 378 works by the avant-garde artists of the 1960s and 1970s, which included works by Daniel Buren, Christian Boltanski, Marcel Broodthaers, Sophie Calle, Henri Chopin, Hanne Darboven, Robert Filliou, Jochen Gerz, Anette Messager, Roman Opalka, Roland Topor and Ben Vautier, as well as issues of the prominent art journals Agentzia, Chorus, Humidité, Opus International, VH 101. The donation set off a systematic collecting of all genres, and with the revitalization of the Biennial, MGLC became more excited by all types of art printing as well as purchases and donations, which grew significantly after the success of the 25th Graphic Arts Biennial, acquiring to date an impressive number of works by authors such as Vito Acconci, George Brecht, Daniel Buren, Christian Boltanski, Marcel Broodthaers, James Lee Byars, Sophie Calle, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Robert Filliou, the Fischli-Weiss duo, Jochen Gerz, Roni Horn, Sanja Iveković, Alfredo Jaar, Ilja Kabakov, Thomas Kapielski, Allan Kaprow, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Mangelos, Miha Maleš, Anette Messager, OHO, Roman Opalka, Iztok Osojnik, Raymond Pettibon, Dušan Pirih Hup, Sigmar Polke, Dieter Roth, Edward Ruscha, Jean Tinguely, Roland Topor, Ben Vautier, Petra Varl, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Franz West, Emmett Williams and Franci Zagoričnik, as well as the collection of original newspaper projects which also included museum in progress from Vienna, published in Der Standard newspaper between 1990 and 2002.

Important museum and study materials are also represented by the FV archive donated to MGLC in 2006 by Neven Korda, the archive of The Scarecrow Statelet, a donation by Milena Kosec, the extensive archive of the events of the Zagreb art scene between 1970–1990 collected over the years by Darko Šimičić, the extensive archive of Bernard Villers’ self-published Éditions du Remorquer (1978–2008), and most of the issues of the Point d'Ironie hybrid periodical (1997–2010).

Presentation of the collection

Enter your e-mail:
ARCHIVE

ANNOUNCING A NEW EXHIBITION

Nataša Berk: 1st Unlimited Edition

2. 4.–19. 5. 2019

Opening:
2 April, at 7 pm
Švicarija

The exhibition is part of the year-long programme of Švicarija, which in 2019 focuses on the analysis of the state of independent journalism and the right of the public to information in pursuit of the slogan community, art and nature. The participating artists question the credibility of images and their meanings at a time of the oversaturation with visual impulses and analyse the ambiguity of media messages on the world wide web.

The spatial intervention by Nataša Berk and the group of artists at Švicarija presents their diverse visual production, which usually takes place in the virtual space of the world wide web and social networks. On this occasion, it has moved into a physical space. Together, they explore the phenomenology of the image within public circulation and its impact on the perception of reality. In ironic ways, they address the norms of the advertising industry, the tendencies of the mass media, voyeurism and the social convention of the individual’s appearance. Thus, works devoted to the consideration of the nature of the image in everyday life are presented as part of the exhibition. In such a way, photographs, videos and collages open up the questions of understanding visual culture in an era when the public space has become saturated with contents and images, questions about the manipulation of the image and the ambivalence of its meanings.    

Curator: Miha Colner


Photo: Nataša Berk.

THE 1ST GUIDED TOUR OF THE EXHIBITION

TODAY

Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s and
Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

Tuesday, March 26, at 5.30 pm
in English
at 5 pm in Slovenian

Admission for the exhibition, the guided tour is free.
Conducted by Gregor Dražil, Museum Information Officer.

Warmly welcome!

Opening of the exhibition

Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s and
Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

opening:
Friday, March 22, at 6 pm

22. 3.–19. 5. 2019

The exhibition is made up of two sections. The first, bearing the title Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s, is dedicated to Japanese printmaking of the 1970s and was organised by the Japan Foundation, while the second, the documentary section, is entitled Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration and has been prepared by the International Centre of Graphic Arts.

The travelling exhibition Photographic Images and Matter, with a selection of the most representative artists, presents the orientations within Japanese printmaking of the 1970s, which was the golden age of the print medium in Japan. The curator of the exhibition Kyoji Takizawa has made an attractive selection of artists, who have received many awards within the international arena and form the core of the modernist and avant-garde scene of the 1970s.

The documentary exhibition Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration, on the other hand, illuminates one of the many socio-artistic chapters tied to the history of the Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljubljana. Through the selection of pictorial, archival, photographic and other material, it aims to show the communication between the geographically and politically disparate countries as part of an ambitious international art event like the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts. Exhibition authors are Nevenka Šivavec and Gregor Dražil.

The exhibition is accompanied by an international symposium under the same title, taking place in the month of May.

Exhibition design: Ivian Kan Mujezinović and Mina Fina.


Tetsuya Noda: Diary, September 11, '68 (woodcut and silkscreen).