The year-long programme Švicarija: Community, Art and Nature presents an event with a sensorial approach conceived by Barabara Pia Jenič.

The first public presentation takes place on Summer Museum Night, on Saturday, 16 June, at the Švicarija Creative Centre in Tivoli Park.

Švicarija, the house in Tivoli Park, has swapped many identities during the course of its existence, many people have found shelter behind its walls, and its uses have changed over time. It is a space filled with individual and collective meanings. Švicarija has, among other things, functioned as a guest house, a hotel, a residence for those on the margins, an art production centre, a material reference to the identity of its inhabitants, as well as a home. (A. Boštjančič, Identitete neke hiše [Identities of a House], 2015)

At the workshops, the participants linked the sensorial theatre language to the cultural heritage of the Tivoli Hotel: we listened to the history of the building through various perspectives of sensual perception. On Summer Museum Night, visitors will be taken through the originally conceived and staged snippets of  its history. 

There are 30 places available each hour to experience the sensorial guided tour of the snippets of the lives of the people in Švicarija. Reservations are released 15 minutes before the event, so please make sure that you take your ticket at the box office 15 minutes before the beginning of the event. Please leave your luggage and personal items at home. You enter the event with eyes blindfolded and with no personal luggage. We apologise for any inconvenience!

Performances
Saturday, 16 July, at 6 pm (30 places)
Saturday, 16 July, at 8 pm (30 places)
Bookings to petra.derganc@mglc-lj.si

Author and director of the event: Barbara Pia Jenič
Inspired by and modelled on: Andraž Boštjančič, Identitete neke hiše [Identities of a House], degree thesis
Texts used: Ivan Cankar, Bela krizantema [The White Chrysanthemum]; Valenčič Jožef, Vzgoja in omika ali izvir sreče [Education and Manners or the Source of Happiness], 1899
Audio interpretations of Bonton na Promenadi [Good Manners on Promenade] and Bela krizantema [The White Chrysanthemum]: Tomaž Gubenšek
Audio interpretations from the performances: Marija Nablocka
Sound:
Russian and Gypsy romances: Aleksander Konjajev
Domžale March and General Maister March performed by the Slovenian Army Orchestra
Archive recordings of Nablocka, source: SLOGI Sound and Video Archive – Theatre Museum, Ljubljana
Sound effects design: Peter Penko
Costumes:
Costume selection: Incognito design
Costume consultation: Erna Nelc
Sensorial artists: Gloria Ana Belopavlovič, Veronika Golob, Katja Krajnc, Meta Kutin, Ana Obid, Urša Eva Pucelj, Teja Saksida, Tina Zadravec
Author and project leader: Yasmín Martín Vodopivec
Concept of education programme: Lili Šturm

Barbara Pia Jenič is the founder of the Senzorium Theatre, the author and director of many performances, as well as an actress with a master degree in Speech. Her creative engagement comprises more than 60 directed events and performances. She was also mentor and director at the BB Drama School for more than 16 years. She conducts various education programmes within the field of sensorial language, speech and acting, among others, also for medical staff through Slovenia Transplant and UKC Ljubljana. As a pioneer of sensorial theatre and language in Slovenia, and one of the few such creators in Europe and in the world, she has been leading the way over the past 20 years, exploring the field of the sensorial, interaction with the public, the multi-sensory, immersion in events, as well as artistic synesthesia.

Special thanks: Andraž Boštjančič, Flora Kastelic, Atila Boštjančič, Jaka Mihelič, Jakov Brdar, Jaka Železnikar, Slovenian Army Orchestra, Aljoša Deferri, Dean UL AGRFT Tomaž Gubenšek, SLOGI – Theatre Museum, MGL and Erna Nelc, Nataša Trtnik, Ivanka Mežan, as well as Zora Konjajev and Andrej Konjajev for the private archival recordings

The Tivoli Hotel between Memories and Dreams programme is part of the Švicarija: Community, Art and Nature project by Yasmín Martín Vodopivec. The event was made in co-production with the Senzorium Institute.

Enter your e-mail:
ARCHIVE

From the Biennial Prize Winners Collection: Shifts in the Canon

Robert Jančovič, Rez I Nazenie-Pasca/, 1996, colour woodcut

 

Exhibition:

From the Biennial Prize Winners Collection: Shifts in the Canon

7 November 2019–23 February 2020

Every review of the history of the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts is also informed by the stories inscribed by the prize winners of this exhibition. The selection made by the jury members – esteemed and influential art critics, curators, art dealers and other experts from all over the world – was, for many years, the only intervention into the seemingly multitudinous mass of exhibited artworks. The eagerly awaited and often critically-acclaimed decisions imparted the event with a touch of creative competition and were the driving force of the discourse that was generated by the exhibition in the professional and general public as well as the media. After every Biennial, when the hundreds of exhibited prints disappeared from the halls and what remained was only their trace in the form of an exhibition catalogue, a handful of selected works and artists – the winners chosen by the most prominent international jury – were inscribed into the history of the biennial in capital letters, and hence into the annals of worldwide printmaking.

In a sense, the exhibition of works by the prize winners from the collection of the MGLC – International Centre of Graphic Arts aims to get us thinking about the message of the awards of the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts in the context of the canon of post-war art. Most often, the jury did not validate the Biennial’s basic guidelines regarding the quality of the artworks, nevertheless, their decisions spoke volumes in various other ways. The wavering between the need to consolidate already established directions and discover new, unknown ones can be noticed throughout.

On the other hand, the exhibition offers an insight into the collecting policy of MGLC, an institution based precisely on the heritage of the Biennial. Particularly those works that have been acquired by the museum through purchase and donation in the recent period and works that have not been especially exposed will be on display. They have been arranged chronologically into three main sections from the first exhibition of prints in 1955 to the present.

The shifts in the exhibited works from the first two periods, from 1955 to 1977, and from 1979 to 2001, can primarily be seen in the form and content of the graphic print. The prints demonstrate the emergence and consolidation of new artistic directions in the 1960s and 1970s, especially the distinct aesthetics of art informel, geometric abstraction and pop art. From the pool, not lacking in art celebrities of the older generation, the juries often awarded the most coveted prizes to young artists, the rising stars with highly innovative artistic insights.

The shifts in the printmaking of the late 1970s can also be seen in the award-winning works. With the era of popularity of the more contemporary printmaking techniques having subsided, classical ones, especially intaglio printing, came to the fore again, along with the greater popularity of smaller formats and more intimate subject matter. The award-winning works from the 1980s and 1990s do not bring about any essential artistic innovation, but rather exhibit an interlacement and diversification of established aesthetics and approaches.

With the new millennium, the Biennial experienced some radical shifts and breaks. The display of works in national pavilions was replaced by an original, curatorial approach, which has recently undergone attempts at inquiry and experimentation. At the same time, the range of artwork formats has gradually expanded. A leap from classical printmaking to the art of printing in a diversity of techniques occurred, whereas later the Biennial has also adopted performative as well as other contemporary practices. The two processes have, of course, also impacted the meaning of the prizes and the physical dimensions of the awarded works.

Authors of the exhibition: Nevenka Šivavec, Breda Škrjanec and Gregor Dražil