You are invited to participate in creating the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts as part of the project To whom does this architecture belong? by artist Erica Ferrari!

This is an invitation to write your thoughts about the the city of Ljubljana, the public treatment of the architecture, heritage, sculptures, tourism. What do you think about how the city is evolving/changing? How does this affect you, your relation with the city, your daily routine. 

The sentences will be part of an artistic project by a Brazilian artist at the 23nd Biennial of Graphic Arts and will be written on the facade of Tivoli Mansion.

Please answer back this e-amil with one or more sentences it will stay in total anonimity you can write in english or slovenian.

We count with your thoughts! Thank you

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About the artist

Erica Ferrari (1981) lives and works in São Paulo, Brazil. She graduated in Visual Arts from the University of São Paulo with a BA in Sculpture. Her work focuses on the relationships between architecture, landscape and day-to-day life in the city. This includes a study of the historic and symbolic density of architectural structures, different representations of the idea of landscape and the elements that visually compose our understanding of what is constructed and what is natural. The pieces are presented as objects or panels, usually constructed of materials commonly used in houses and furniture like wood, plaster and formica.

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About the project To whom does this architecture belong?

Phrases collected, video intervention and souvenir

Architecture and its uses model life in the city. In a metropolis like São Paulo, in constant destruction and construction of its physical configuration, transience not only reflects the usually predatory dynamics of the real estate market, but also the lack of regulation and conservation of buildings and public spaces by the government. In this context of changes, how does the population express itself and consolidate its identity? One of the most interesting ways is graffiti. From the 1960s, the practice of writing over architecture became a symbol of political protest, a manifestation of identity and expression. The practice took its own characteristics in São Paulo, with the development of a specific spelling added to the challenge of writing in the high buildings of the city. In the last year, because of the tense political situation in Brazil, graffiti with political messages have reappeared strongly, particularly in the center of the city. The same practice of expression can be observed in Ljubljana, however, with some striking differences. As the center of the city has undergone a restoration process in recent years, the graffiti are not easily found there. Messages can be seen in the surrounding areas, in specific buildings that have not yet been "embellished" or in building sidings. Many of them refer to the anti-fascist struggle and the consolidation of Slovenian identity, a country that only gained independence in 1991.

In this sense, we can think of this restoration of the center of Ljubljana as part of a global scenario of investments by governments to make cities more ecological, cultural and 'beautiful', thus becoming an attraction for private investments of all kinds and part of the tourism industry. If, on the one hand, this dynamic has immediate positive results in the economy and in the physical aspect of buildings, on the other hand, it can lead to the expulsion of the traditional inhabitants of the center and cause a lack of recognition of the population with that historical and primordial space.

In the project proposed here this context is the starting point to investigate the dubiousness of this process in the city, using the facade of the International Center of Graphic Arts - MGLC - as support. As a historical building of the XVIII century, like many other constructions of this type, the building is marked by the change of uses during its existence, being a residence of nobles, property of the Church, serving for state functions and now housing a museum. Due to its location, it can be seen in the distance in the middle of the vegetation of Tivoli Park. Taking advantage of this configuration, the facade of the building will be used as a screen for the display of phrases collected from residents of Ljubljana. This collection will be done in the most anonymous way possible, through a specific email. The idea is that the facade of historical construction becomes the vehicle of manifestation of the population's thinking about the current dynamics of the city and privileged support of claim and expression of identity. The sentences will be written in the style of the graffiti observed by the city, practice that revealing opinions using the architecture itself as a support.

Inside the MGLC, it will be possible to purchase a souvenir typical of European museums (the decorative dish) with the representation of the building with the graffiti in its facade.

 

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ARCHIVE

NATAŠA BERK: 1ST UNLIMITED EDITION

2. 4.–19. 5. 2019

Opening:
2 April, at 7 pm
Švicarija

The exhibition is part of the year-long programme of Švicarija, which in 2019 focuses on the analysis of the state of independent journalism and the right of the public to information in pursuit of the slogan community, art and nature. The participating artists question the credibility of images and their meanings at a time of the oversaturation with visual impulses and analyse the ambiguity of media messages on the world wide web.

The spatial intervention by Nataša Berk and the group of artists at Švicarija presents their diverse visual production, which usually takes place in the virtual space of the world wide web and social networks. On this occasion, it has moved into a physical space. Together, they explore the phenomenology of the image within public circulation and its impact on the perception of reality. In ironic ways, they address the norms of the advertising industry, the tendencies of the mass media, voyeurism and the social convention of the individual’s appearance. Thus, works devoted to the consideration of the nature of the image in everyday life are presented as part of the exhibition. In such a way, photographs, videos and collages open up the questions of understanding visual culture in an era when the public space has become saturated with contents and images, questions about the manipulation of the image and the ambivalence of its meanings.    

Curator: Miha Colner


Photo: Nataša Berk.

ANNOUNCING the 33rd Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts: Crack Up – Crack Down

7. 6.–29. 9. 2019

Curator:
art collective Slavs and Tatars
31 artists on 9 venues in Ljubljana

Crack Up – Crack Down will take an expansive view of the genre of satire today, featuring works by historical and contemporary international artists, as well as interventions by activists, new media polemicists, performances by stand-up comedians, and others. For the 33rd edition of the Biennial, Slavs and Tatars consider ‘the graphic’ not as a medium, but as an agency. They question how graphic language engenders a form of infra-politics via irony and ridicule as a particularly resilient and contemporary form of critique. Purported to speak truth to power, satire has proven itself to be a petri dish in a world of post-truth bacteria

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POVEZUJEM/TIVOLI CREATIVE CIRCLE

The PovezujeM/Tivoli Creative Circle
programme
, which is organised by the museums around Tivoli Park, will take place again during the summer holidays.

Two time-frames are available:
8–12 July and 26–30 August,
from 8 am to 4 pm. 

Further details will be available soon!

You can pre-book your place by writing to: petra.derganc@mglc-lj.si

Part of the circle: National Museum of Slovenia, Museum of Modern Art, National Museum of Contemporary History, National Gallery of Slovenia and International Centre of Graphic Arts.

Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s and Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

22. 3.–19. 5. 2019

GUIDED TOUR OF THE EXHIBITION

Tuesday, April 23, at 5.30 pm
in English
at 5 pm in Slovenian

Admission for the exhibition, the guided tour is free.
Conducted by the co-author of the exhibition Gregor Dražil, Museum Information Officer.

Warmly welcome!


Photo: Urška Boljkovac. MGLC Archive.

The Family fold’r 

Dear families, you are kindly invited to explore the MGLC gallery!
We have again prepared the Family fold’r for you, which you receive free of charge when you purchase a family ticket to view the exhibition.
This time, some curious cards are waiting for you inside, and they need to find their places in the gallery with your help and the help of your children.

Good luck!

Exhibition's symposium
Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

Wednesday, 15 May, 14.30–19.00, 
International Centre of Graphic Arts

Symposium timeline
14:00 Gregor Dražil: An Outline of Collaboration between Japan and Slovenia in the Area of Printmaking
*14:40 Bert Winther-Tamaki: The Wood Aesthetic of the “Creative Prints” Movement of Japan, 1945 to 1965
15:20 Wiktor Komorowski: From Washi to Politics: Printmaking and the Cold War Japonisme
16:00–16:20 Break
16:20 Marjeta Ciglenečki: Forma Viva in Slovenia and Japanese Artists
17:00 Noriaki Sangawa: The Japanese Art Group Ryu and Its Collaboration with the Slovenian Moderna galerija and the Biennial of Graphic Arts

Visiting lecture
*Bert Winther-Tamaki: What Happens to Contemporary Art Made in Japan When Exhibited Outside of Japan?
*The lecture will take place on Monday, 13 May, at 18:00 at the Faculty of Arts, room 343. The lecture is co-organised by the Department of Art History.

The symposium will be held in English.

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Photo: Jaka Babnik. MGLC Archive.

opening:
Friday, March 22, at 6 pm

The exhibition is made up of two sections. The first, bearing the title Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s, is dedicated to Japanese printmaking of the 1970s and was organised by the Japan Foundation, while the second, the documentary section, is entitled Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration and has been prepared by the International Centre of Graphic Arts.

The travelling exhibition Photographic Images and Matter, with a selection of the most representative artists, presents the orientations within Japanese printmaking of the 1970s, which was the golden age of the print medium in Japan. The curator of the exhibition Kyoji Takizawa has made an attractive selection of artists, who have received many awards within the international arena and form the core of the modernist and avant-garde scene of the 1970s.

The documentary exhibition Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration, on the other hand, illuminates one of the many socio-artistic chapters tied to the history of the Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljubljana. Through the selection of pictorial, archival, photographic and other material, it aims to show the communication between the geographically and politically disparate countries as part of an ambitious international art event like the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts. Exhibition authors are Nevenka Šivavec and Gregor Dražil.

The exhibition is accompanied by an international symposium under the same title, taking place in the month of May.

Exhibition design: Ivian Kan Mujezinović and Mina Fina.


Tetsuya Noda: Diary, September 11, '68 (woodcut and silkscreen).