THE PRIZES OF THE 32nd BIENNIAL OF GRAPHIC ARTS 

The Grand Prize winner of the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts is Alejandro Paz.

Research Residency Award was given to Carlos Monroy.

The jury of the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts: Anne Barlow, Mike Cooter, Bige Örer in Maruša Sagadin.

 

Grand Prize of the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts: Alejandro Paz

In his project for the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts, Alejandro Paz engages with the patches of paint removal and analysis that reveal the layers of history contained within the fabric of the architecture housing MGLC’s galleries. Paz’s subtle interventions overlay these fragments with partial images of the tattooed skin of Guatemalan prisoners – itself a set of complex registrations of class, social status and gang membership that is concealed by the architecture of state power. By striking a compelling balance between graphic photographic imagery and a poetic evocation of the registrations of history layered in the skins of bodies both architectural and physical, Paz’s work for the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts is a powerful rumination on the interwoven social, architectural and political factors that constitute individual and collective identity. On the strength of this work, within a larger practice that encompasses art and architecture, performance and installation, the jury was delighted to select Alejandro Paz as the winner of the 2017 Grand Prix.

Work on the Biennial: Hypodermic (2017, intervention), made for the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts.


Photo: Jaka Babnik. MGLC Archive.

 

Research Residency Award: Carlos Monroy

Carlos Monroy’s work for the Biennial impressively staged and overlaid a number of folk narratives of rebirth and regeneration in nature. Inspired by the Slovenian carnival figure of the kurent, Monroy initiated performances of a number of costumed representations of mythical figures that are at once the focus and embodiment of these folk celebrations. By engaging with Slovenian history (Monroy includes a woodcut by France Mihelič from 1955 depicting the kurent in his installation) and performers from the Contemporary Dance Studio (Ljubljana), Monroy produced an atmospheric video installation of these comparative, curiously solitary and mysterious rites being performed through the city at night. By using the body as a political and aesthetic tool, Monroy’s work raises interesting questions about the performance of ritual across cultures, research that the Jury believes would benefit greatly from the engagement with Ljubljana offered by the award of the Jury Prize and residency.

Work on the Biennial: Baphomet. One single birth made incarnate. (2017, performance and video installation), made for the 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts.


Photo: Jaka Babnik. MGLC Archive.

 

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ARCHIVE

ANNOUNCING A NEW EXHIBITION

Nataša Berk: 1st Unlimited Edition

2. 4.–19. 5. 2019

Opening:
2 April, at 7 pm
Švicarija

The exhibition is part of the year-long programme of Švicarija, which in 2019 focuses on the analysis of the state of independent journalism and the right of the public to information in pursuit of the slogan community, art and nature. The participating artists question the credibility of images and their meanings at a time of the oversaturation with visual impulses and analyse the ambiguity of media messages on the world wide web.

The spatial intervention by Nataša Berk and the group of artists at Švicarija presents their diverse visual production, which usually takes place in the virtual space of the world wide web and social networks. On this occasion, it has moved into a physical space. Together, they explore the phenomenology of the image within public circulation and its impact on the perception of reality. In ironic ways, they address the norms of the advertising industry, the tendencies of the mass media, voyeurism and the social convention of the individual’s appearance. Thus, works devoted to the consideration of the nature of the image in everyday life are presented as part of the exhibition. In such a way, photographs, videos and collages open up the questions of understanding visual culture in an era when the public space has become saturated with contents and images, questions about the manipulation of the image and the ambivalence of its meanings.    

Curator: Miha Colner


Photo: Nataša Berk.

THE 1ST GUIDED TOUR OF THE EXHIBITION

TODAY

Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s and
Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

Tuesday, March 26, at 5.30 pm
in English
at 5 pm in Slovenian

Admission for the exhibition, the guided tour is free.
Conducted by Gregor Dražil, Museum Information Officer.

Warmly welcome!

Opening of the exhibition

Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s and
Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration

opening:
Friday, March 22, at 6 pm

22. 3.–19. 5. 2019

The exhibition is made up of two sections. The first, bearing the title Photographic Images and Matter: Japanese Prints of the 1970s, is dedicated to Japanese printmaking of the 1970s and was organised by the Japan Foundation, while the second, the documentary section, is entitled Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration and has been prepared by the International Centre of Graphic Arts.

The travelling exhibition Photographic Images and Matter, with a selection of the most representative artists, presents the orientations within Japanese printmaking of the 1970s, which was the golden age of the print medium in Japan. The curator of the exhibition Kyoji Takizawa has made an attractive selection of artists, who have received many awards within the international arena and form the core of the modernist and avant-garde scene of the 1970s.

The documentary exhibition Japan, Yugoslavia and the Biennial of Graphic Arts: Documents of Collaboration, on the other hand, illuminates one of the many socio-artistic chapters tied to the history of the Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljubljana. Through the selection of pictorial, archival, photographic and other material, it aims to show the communication between the geographically and politically disparate countries as part of an ambitious international art event like the Ljubljana Biennial of Graphic Arts. Exhibition authors are Nevenka Šivavec and Gregor Dražil.

The exhibition is accompanied by an international symposium under the same title, taking place in the month of May.

Exhibition design: Ivian Kan Mujezinović and Mina Fina.


Tetsuya Noda: Diary, September 11, '68 (woodcut and silkscreen).